English Treen Beechwood Octagonal Trencher 16th / 17th Century
 
 English Treen Beechwood Octagonal Trencher 16th / 17th Century
 English Treen Beechwood Octagonal Trencher 16th / 17th Century
 English Treen Beechwood Octagonal Trencher 16th / 17th Century
 English Treen Beechwood Octagonal Trencher 16th / 17th Century
 English Treen Beechwood Octagonal Trencher 16th / 17th Century
 
 English Treen Beechwood Octagonal Trencher 16th / 17th Century

English Treen Beechwood Octagonal Trencher 16th / 17th Century

£1,650

The word "Rare" does not really come into play regarding this piece because.... this shouldnt really exist! addmitedley  similar examples which are the painted roundals or the correct term to use 
Roundelays the ones with certain rhymes / verses etc..which a person would read after eating on the reverse side... yes they are rare... but this one... well.. it just  shouldnt exist..... but it does.To my knowledge I know of one other simlar / identical  example which was sold at the same time as this piece with a lable on reverse reading Owen Evan Thomas which is where this one has come from .. I also believe a simlar example  from the Pinto collection, so ... ok  3 including this one ..
  English Treen Beechwood Octagonal Trencher .. The word Trencher taken from an old French word "Tranchier" to cut was the equivalent of a side dish which was commonly used by mostly wealthly people during the middle ages and medieval times at the dinner table... A scene from the famous Bayeux Tapestry shows people sitting around a table with small octagonal dishes
these Tranchier / trenchers were used for sweetmeats / fruits etc.. which would of been cut with a small fine knife.. Most of the more modest trenchers of the time would have eventually been thrown away due to them wearing out & breaking etc.. with new ones being provided.
This Trencher being more of a modest one, survival  rates almost non existant , due to the forementioned .. the colour to this piece of beechwood is quite staggering .. almost like a good piece of ancient oak.. but its beechwood which makes it even more special. The edges of this ancient piece of tableware have turned black in colour with a overall choclate brown hue throughout, the patination is second to none, the reverse side slightly lighter in colour with the remnants of a old label shadowline to one corner .. the thickness of this trencher being only 4mm depth  height & width being 6.5"sq.. a wonder of nature survivor.
 
  England  16th / 17th Century
  Beechwood.
  Reference Owen Evan Thomas  Domestic Untesils Of Wood
  Pinto Collection.

Dimensions :
16.5 cms High (6.5 inches)
16.5 cms Wide (6.5 inches)